Collaborative Divorce Can Help You Capitalize on the Holiday Season Spirit

San Diego family law attorney Colleen Warren

by Colleen A. Warren, Esq.
Certified Legal Specialist – Family Law, LEWIS, WARREN & SETZER, LLP

San Diego family law attorney Colleen WarrenWhat did you do during the holiday season? Most of us enjoyed spending time with family and friends. Many people put their differences aside during the holidays and attempted to live together harmoniously for the sake of the children or their family, or to ensure no one else knows they are unhappy in their marriage.

Many people wonder, “Now that I have made it through the holidays, is it the right time to tell my spouse I want a divorce?” Those same people do not want to disrupt their family life by separating or divorcing.  However, now may be the best time to have this most difficult conversation and capitalize on the feel good spirit enjoyed during the holidays.

If you have children, Summer Break is still six months away, and the next holiday season is a little less than a year away.  If you are worried about how a divorce or separation will impact you financially, you are likely to know, or at least have a better sense of, what you and your spouse earned last year, or how your investments fared over the last 12 months.  Now is the time to resolve your differences, rather than waiting until quick decisions must be made.

Rather than start a divorce or separation with fighting, posturing, or all-out war, Collaborative Divorce can help you and your spouse capitalize on the holiday spirit, resolving issues in a manner where each party feels supported.  You and your spouse will work with a team of expert attorneys, coaches, and financial advisors, to reach agreements that are beneficial to both parties and their family, all without going to court.  Imagine resolving all the issues in your separation without seeing a judge, without exposing the most intimate details of your life in a public court? This type of resolution is promoted and highly successful through the use of Collaborative Divorce.

The professionals in the San Diego Collaborative Family Law Group are here to assist you to resolve the issues between you and your spouse without traditional litigation. See our “Contact Us” page to find someone to answer the questions you may have about whether Collaborative Divorce is right for you.

Interview: Tips For Successful Holiday Co-Parenting

Divorce, Holidays and Children

Divorce, Holidays and ChildrenThe holidays aren’t always happy when you’re a single parent trying to work with your children’s mother or father to accommodate everyone’s schedule, see relatives, and spend special holiday time with the kids.

Collaborative Family Law Group of San Diego members Shawn Weber, attorney with Brave Weber Mack; and Justin Reckers, director of Pacific Divorce Management, recently appeared on “Real Estate Radio” on AM1700 to talk about the holidays and divorce. The pair offered tips for successful holiday co-parenting in divorced and separated families.

You can listen to the podcast on demand at this link.

 

 

Nine Holiday Tips For Divorced Moms, Dads, and Kids

Family Christmas Fun Divorces

Family Christmas Fun DivorcesFamily holidays are held up to impossible standards by the media and our memories. Gatherings, gifts, meals and events are all expected to be picture perfect. Who could possibly live up to these standards?

Add the realities of separation and divorce and the holidays become that much more difficult. As families start wrestling with custody and visitation schedules, winter vacations and even gift-giving, the phones start ringing off the hook in family law offices all over the country.

Most attorneys do not put rushing into court to file emergency legal documents at the last minute during the holiday season at the top of their wish list. Courts are busy. It’s never a good time to ask the legal system to do the thinking for you.

Members of the Collaborative Family Law Group of San Diego encourage you to think ahead. Consider these tips provided by attorney member Myra Fleischer so you can enjoy your holiday season with minimum stress for you and your children. Bonus: you’ll avoid the added financial expense of legal bills.

 

What Divorcing Parents Must Do When Spring Break and Teenagers Mix

By Julia M. Garwood, CFLS, Attorney at Law, Garwood Family Law and Mediation

Spring BreakSpring break will be going on across the nation for the next month.  Various schools will be getting out for one to two weeks.  What do parents do when one parent wants to say “no” to their son or daughter’s wishes to go with their high school or college friends to vacation paradises in the United States, Caribbean or Mexico?  The answer is: It depends.

In California, the age of your teenager matters. In California, when your child reaches age 18, the parents really have no legal say. The child is considered an adult. In other jurisdictions, the age of emancipation may be different.

If the child is under the age of 18, what does the order say, whether it was by agreement or a court order?  You don’t have to follow it if the two of you as parents agree, but it is enforceable if one parent wants to allow their child to go on the trip and the other does not.  Complicating this matter may be the opinion of the child.  After all, you are dealing with a teenager.

Will the child be coming to you for the cost of the trip? If so, you can decide if you are going to shell out for the airfare, hotel and miscellaneous costs…. but don’t think these costs will be a replacement for any Court ordered child support if the age of your child dictates that the order is still in effect.

Hopefully, you and your ex-spouse can work out the issues so that everyone is satisfied. Advance planning is the key. Whether your son or daughter goes on the trip or not, a spring break for your child should always be something special, fun – and safe.

Gift Giving: Can You Take Out the Emotion and Leave the Joy?

CFLG San Diego member Justin Reckers, CFP®, CDFATM, AIF®, managing director at Pacific Divorce Management, was recently interviewed for a story about advising financial clients about how to keep holiday spending under control. While Justin doesn’t specifically address divorced families, it’s not uncommon for divorced parents to try and make it up to their children by giving lavish gifts that they really cannot afford. This is great advice for them, and for anyone tempted to spend beyond his or her means.

Read the article here.

 

 

The first family Christmas post-divorce

The first family Christmas after a divorce can be daunting for anyone. Read here how newly divorced mom Heidi StPink Christmasevens handled the situation with a promise for a pink Christmas tree. Do you have tips to share about navigating that first holiday – or birthday, summer vacation, or school play – after parents get divorced?